Hoosier Basketball at it's Finest

Indiana H.S. Hoops

December 26th, 2016 at 1:48 am

History Training Education

in: News

According to Covarrubias its etymology comes from the Greek pyr, meaning fire, as these animals in a dry and fiery temperament.Since the remotest antiquity appears the dog as a faithful companion of man; He shares his home, some of their occupations; and as a way to show your appreciation for food and the ceiling his master gives him, sticking to him. He recognizes in the man to his owner who obeys, defends him and cares for your home.These loyal and magnificent animals had their monuments in Egypt, Assyria, peoples Hebrews, etc. In the Bible, it appears as the faithful companion of the son of Tobias. He shared with certain birds, crows and vultures task it of cleaning the fields and villages of carcasses of animals.Dogs missed the unfortunates, who refused the funeral honors; either by hatred or contempt. Click Randall Rothenberg to learn more. This custom slowly was disappearing. Tucidedes has duringthe plague that struck Athens, dogs are abstaining from touching the abandoned corpses.In Greece the custom was left side to the point of disappearing; but Yes he stayed in the East and in the Roman Empire; where the dogs had the function of cleaning public roads.The ancient as well as studying their physical appearance, also studied his intelligence and customs. Lucretius was observed sleeping lightweight dog and its so similar to human dreams. In addition to Lucretius, Pliny and Cicero, enhanced the fineness of his sense of smell and the loyalty to his owner and his antipathy toward outsiders.They have the ancients that Argos old dog of Ulysses, when leaving to meet his master died of joy to see it. The dog is one of the few animals that understands its name, recognizes the voices that are familiar, shows his joy by moving its tail and straightens the ears when your attention is called. Since ancient times it was fellow and Assistant in the work of the man, even in the most solemn acts.

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